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The Need for Term Limits

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Introduction to the Guest Author, Young Patriot Rising

Hello! Young Patriot Rising here writing about the need for term limits! Thank you, GenZ Conservative, for asking me to do a guest post on your blog! To introduce myself, I write my own blog to express my political opinions. Feel free to comment and share! I attend the University of Florida, and I’m studying Business Administration with an area of specialization and minor in Communication Studies. I’m also a correspondent for Campus Reform and am very involved with politics on campus, locally, and nationally. Plus, I’m also a GenZ conservative Republican. Please check out and subscribe to my blog! https://youngpatriotrising.blogspot.com/. And follow me on Twitter @hannrose2046. Happy reading everyone!!

The Need for Term Limits in America

Something I’ve found most conservatives and liberals agree on is the need for term limits. Term limits, in my opinion, should be required. After all, the President of the United States is required only two terms in office, so why don’t members of Congress or Senate have limits on how long they can remain in Congress? People shouldn’t be allowed to stay in the same seat if they’re not getting things done, which I’ve seen many Democrats and a number of Republicans do. Restrictions on the number of terms a Congressman or Senator can serve has an approval rating of 82%. That proves Americans agree on the issue with Congress and Senate. For my guest post, I’ll be discussing why we need term limits.

Are Term Limits Constitutional?

To decide if term limits are unconstitutional, look at the founders of the Constitution and Articles of Confederation. James Madison said, “[A] few of the members of Congress will possess superior talents; will by frequent re-elections, become members of long standing… The greater the proportion of new members of Congress, and the less the information of the bulk of the members, the more apt they be to fall into the snares that may be laid before them.”  

Similarly, Thomas Jefferson urged for term limits “to prevent every danger which might arise to American freedom by continuing too long in office the members of the Continental Congress.” The fifth article of the Articles of Confederation (1781-1789) states “no person shall be capable of being a delegate [to the continental congress] for more than three years in any term of six years.”

There has always been debate for whether we need to place limits on terms or not, so if it’s up for you to decide. But, personally, I don’t believe they are unconstitutional. Too many people are getting paid to sit on their behind and not do anything. In recognition of that fact, Congressman Ted Cruz (R-TX) and Senator Pat Toomey (R-PA), among others, have proposed term limits.

The Benefits of Term Limits

Americans are tired of seeing politicians make promises, and almost never follow through with them. Instead of allowing these politicians to be reelected for numerous years, term limits would help stop the endless corruption.

Don’t get me wrong: there are still a few good politicians who care about Americans and follow through on their promises, such as President Donald Trump, but even they cannot stay in politics forever.

They have to retire eventually, and allow fresh faces to come in. Serving in politics shouldn’t be a lifelong job. Congress, especially the Democrats in it, is a mess, as we saw with impeachment. There was no bipartisanship during that ridiculous process. Just partisanship and acrimony.

Additionally, placing some limits on terms would help the image of Congress, as well as having people who are fair. But what are some pros and cons? Here’s a list of what I found, and a brief explanation of each.

  • Pro: Term limits would limit corruption. If you’re in politics for more than 6-8 years, you’ll become interested in self rather than others, looking for what will help you rather than the people you’re elected to help. I think we’ve all seen that happen in latest news about absurd levels of Democrat corruption.
  • Pro: No more serving in office as a job. There shouldn’t be career politicians. You shouldn’t be getting paid for doing absolutely nothing. Why is Bernie Sanders able to afford THREE HOUSES, when he’s been in politics since 1981? Nancy Pelosi has been in politics since 1976; Maxine Waters has been serving since 1991; Chuck Schumer since 1976. They’ve been getting rich off taxpayer’s dollars for not doing anything. Now you see why politicians get corrupted! They can barely do anything and get paid $174,000 per year, as well as a substantial pension after leaving!
  • Con: Experience is irreplaceable. Many Americans want people with experience in politics. If you’re one of those people, I’d like to ask you something. Did Donald Trump have experience in politics? Is the country suffering because of his lack of political experience? I don’t think you need to have as much involvement in politics as you do in business, or life in general, to become involved in politics. I was told this, regarding being involved in politics: “Start small with college groups. Go out and live life. Have a family, get some business experience. Then if the opportunity presents itself, run for office.”
  • Con: Unelected people would run Congress. Lobbyists or staff would be able to control who comes to run, or who should run. This “vacuum theory” states the departure of senior incumbents creates a vacuum in which decisions will be made by the unelected.

I think it’s safe to say the pros outweigh the cons. To stop the corruption and power trips we currently see coming out of Washington, I think we need to implement term limits. Give these power-hungry Establishment politicians a wake-up call. Want to know how to stop corruption? Show up to the polls and vote.

In closing, I think term limits should be implemented. To prevent more Nancy Pelosi or Maxine Waters or AOCs from taking over, we need to limit how long they can stay in power. That, in my opinion, is the best way to keep corruption from worsening. Republican or Democrat, they all should be limited. That’s not a partisan issue for me.

Sources:

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Term limits were deemed unconstitutional by the SCOTUS in 1995. 23 states had instituted term limit laws. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Term_Limits,_Inc._v._Thornton.

    Justice Clarence Thomas’ dissenting opinion stated that:

    “Nothing in the Constitution deprives the people of each State of the power to prescribe eligibility requirements for the candidates who seek to represent them in Congress. The Constitution is simply silent on this question. And where the Constitution is silent, it raises no bar to action by the States or the people.”

    THIS 5/4 decision by the liberal wing of the court in 1995 could be revisited by the current administration IF it had popular backing. The liberal wing of the court has often been criticized for enacting what amounts to new legislation from the bench. To overturn the laws of 23 states, with more states considering enacting similar legislation in 1995, overreaches the brief of the SCOTUS.

    But it bears remembering that term limits have never enjoyed popularity at the Congressional level because such measures are self-limiting. A constitutional amendment limiting terms introduced in 1995 failed to gain enough votes in the House of Representatives to put the amendment to the states for ratification.

    And while I agree that term limits would prevent the kind of entrenched politicking we currently experience with people like Pelosi, remember that it would also limit the power of people like Mitch McConnell.

    There are two sides to every coin and then there’s making it stand on end.

    • I absolutely agree that there are two sides. If you have any interest in writing a guest article on the case against term limits, just shoot me an email at admin@genzconservative.com! I’d love to hear your opinion on it, as would many readers of the site!

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