The Pen is Mightier than the Sword: How to Write Well

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During a time when people are seeking information and alternative news to mainstream media, we desperately need writers. We might even save The Republic one story at a time. As writers, we trade in the currencies of ideas, and ideas are influential in making change. Writers ultimately will record history. If you have something important to say on a hot or controversial topic, one of the best ways to gain credible visibility and recognition for your ideas is to develop a strongly focused opinion piece, known as an “op-ed.”  

According to a published Pew Research Center report, 55% of U.S. adults now get their news from social media either “often” or “sometimes” – an 8% increase from last year. About three in ten (28%) said they get their news “often,” up from 20% in 2018. As the Pew Research’s reporters noted, “social media is now a part of the news diet of an increasingly large share of the U.S. population.” More Americans Are Getting Their News From Social Media (forbes.com)

Here Are A Few Tips To Get Started: 

When starting your writing, begin with a clear purpose or reason for your article in mind. The goal might be to increase readers’ knowledge, raise awareness, or convince them to accept a position. To illustrate, assume that your objective is to introduce readers’ understanding about some issue, for example, mask mandates. The easy route toward fulfilling this purpose would be to summarize the facts and figures about the effectiveness of the masks. If that tactic seems a bit routine, you might want to think about what is at stake if society ignores the threat of this phenomenon. After adopting this perspective, you might decide that, rather than straightforwardly reporting facts and figures, you could begin your news article with a dramatic description of what the science says about wearing a mask for the prevention of illness. 

The nature of the forum and the beliefs of its readers, and your values will affect the role you adopt, but there will always be options for positioning yourself. To be more specific, even a firm believer in mask mandates-the concerned citizen might just as likely assume other roles, such as an “objective scientist.” Although representing the same general position on the controversy, each of these specific roles suggests a different approach to communicating that position and can help you effectively manage other elements of the rhetorical situation. 

In any situation that requires you to evaluate rhetorical strategies or appeals, you will need to consider the nature of the target audience. This is because audiences differ in terms of values, beliefs, interests, levels of expertise, and so on, and consequently, strategies that will have a significant impact on one set of readers might not be the most effective choices for another. 

As a writer develops in skill, they should seek apprenticeships of proofreaders, such as friends, family, and professors that can give constructive criticism. A great place to find this is within a writing course that will provide ample practice and feedback, which would be the best solution to cover all these amassed steps. 

 RWR original article syndication source.

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